Restaurant Expert Witness Blog

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Quote

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon QuoteOpportunities don’t come to those who wait.

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Quote

Our CEO and forensic expert Howard thinks he made up this quote, but we’re not so sure! It sounds really familiar …

Still, it’s a good one. If you put your best foot forward and live with purpose and intention, people will take notice!

 

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Gets More National Media Exposure

Here He Goes Again

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Gets More National Media Exposure

We don’t like to brag (okay, maybe we do), but Howard Cannon has done it again. No, we haven’t hired anymore office dogs (yet). Instead the buzz around our office has been: Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Gets More National Media Exposure. If you are in the restaurant industry, you’ve probably heard of FSR Magazine. Howard Cannon recently did an interview for an article in FSR Magazine regarding off-site catering. The article will discuss off-site catering topics such as best practices, costs, profit margins, dangerous conditions, etc. Make sure you watch for Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon’s interview appearance in FSR Magazine coming April 2017.

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Gets More National Media Exposure

Want to learn more about Restaurant Expert Witness, Howard Cannon, and the expert services he provides? Click here:  Howard Cannon, Restaurant Expert Witness – Bio;  Visit:  www.RestaurantExpertWitness.com;  call: 800.300.5764  or  Email

Be sure to check out our Media Page:  https://restaurantexpertwitness.com/media-inquiries-restaurant-expert-witness-tv-radio-print-publications/

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Warns of Foodborne Illness Danger.

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Warns of Foodborne Illness Danger.

68% of Foodborne Illnesses Occur in Restaurants.

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Warns of Foodborne Illness Danger.

Food-borne diseases are illnesses contracted by eating contaminated foods or drinking contaminated beverages. According to the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), approximately one in six Americans become ill each year from food-borne diseases, resulting in over 3,000 deaths. This is why Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Warns of Foodborne Illness Danger.

There are more than 250 different food-borne diseases caused by viruses, bacteria, parasites, toxins, metals and prions. Symptoms of food-borne illness range from mild gastroenteritis to life-threatening neurologic, hepatic, and renal syndromes. Food-borne illnesses cost the US about $78 billion per year, so each outbreak prevented can save up to $3 million.

More importantly, preventing outbreaks can save lives.

68% of all foodborne illnesses occur in restaurants.

There’s one question you need to ask to make sure the restaurants you patron are safe and up to date on regulations regarding prevention of food-borne illness: Are you ROSSI safe?

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA),  the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and local public health authorities primarily regulate the quality of food and controls used to prevent food-borne illnesses are regulated primarily by the.  Restaurant OSHA Safety and Security by ROSSI, Inc. CEO and Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon is the definitive source for information on the industry standards and best practices that restaurant owners and managers must know to keep employees and customers safe.

Ask a restaurant manager today: Do you have a copy of Restaurant OSHA Safety and Security?

 

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Celebrates the Life of Waffle House Co-Founder

Waffle House Co-Founder Passes Away After 97 Years

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Celebrates the Life of Waffle House Co-Founder

Here at Restaurant Expert Witness, we love safe restaurants and we love good restaurant people. Because of that, Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon celebrates the life of Waffle House Co-Founder who recently passed away at the age of ninety-seven. Ninety-seven years of life, service, and bacon is definitely something to be celebrated. During his life, he grew the Waffle House chain to 400 restaurants by the end of the 1970’s. Now THAT is a lot of bacon. The Waffle House legacy continues with people frequenting the restaurants regularly more than half-a-century later. One of our favorite things to order at Waffle House is, of course, the bacon. Everybody loves bacon, and if you don’t, you’re wrong. What’s your favorite dish to add bacon to? (Since we all know that bacon makes anything taste better.)

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Celebrates the Life of Waffle House Co-Founder

Want to learn more about Restaurant Expert Witness, Howard Cannon, and the expert services he provides? Click here:  Howard Cannon, Restaurant Expert Witness – Bio;  Visit:  www.RestaurantExpertWitness.com;  call: 800.300.5764  or  Email

Be sure to check out our Media Page:  https://restaurantexpertwitness.com/media-inquiries-restaurant-expert-witness-tv-radio-print-publications/

Restaurant Expert Witness Slip, Trip or Fall Pop Quiz

Restaurant Expert Witness Slip, Trip or Fall Pop Quiz

Restaurant Expert Witness Slip, Trip or Fall Pop Quiz

How many people are injured a day by slips, trips or falls in America’s restaurants?

Every year, approximately 3 million foodservice employees and over 1 million customers are injured by slips, trips or falls in restaurants in the United States.  That means that the answer is C: 10, 958 per day!

Call Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon at 800.300.5764 for expert advice regarding your restaurant or bar slip, trip or fall case today!

 

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Wants You to Know: Forced Tip Sharing

Illegal and Bad for Business

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Wants You to Know: Forced Tip Sharing

Forced tip sharing happens all the time, but that doesn’t mean it’s the legal, right, and smart thing to do. In fact, Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon wants you to know that it is quite the opposite. Not only is forced tip sharing illegal, but it’s also bad for your business. Lawsuits regarding forced tip sharing and tip pooling are popping up left and right all over the country. In fact, one such lawsuit popping up recently in Alabama and another in New York got our office buzzing again. If you have a lawsuit pertaining to wages and tips, Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon is who you need to call. Call us today at 800.300.5764.

Restaurant Expert Witness Howard Cannon Wants You to Know: Forced Tip Sharing

Want to learn more about Restaurant Expert Witness, Howard Cannon, and the expert services he provides? Click here:  Howard Cannon, Restaurant Expert Witness – Bio;  Visit:  www.RestaurantExpertWitness.com;  call: 800.300.5764  or  Email

Be sure to check out our Media Page:  https://restaurantexpertwitness.com/media-inquiries-restaurant-expert-witness-tv-radio-print-publications/

Howard Cannon: The Silver Restaurant Expert Witness

Restaurant Expert Witness Has Gone Gray – Can We Add to it?

Howard Cannon: The Silver Restaurant Expert Witness

Restaurant Expert Witness is known around the office as, Howard Cannon: The Silver Restaurant Expert Witness. When you have almost 30,000 followers on social media and 91% of them are lawyers, it’s not surprise that somewhere along the way the hues have changed leaving Howard Cannon with more gray hairs than not. Since we always like a challenge around the office, we are trying to add a few more touches of gray to his head and you can help us with that by joining us on Facebook and LinkedIn. We promise to not only be here if you have a Restaurant or Bar matter, but also to try to keep you entertained and informed as well. We like to think we are a little funny.

Howard Cannon: The Silver Restaurant Expert Witness

Want to learn more about Restaurant Expert Witness, Howard Cannon, and the expert services he provides? Click here:  Howard Cannon, Restaurant Expert Witness – Bio;  Visit:  www.RestaurantExpertWitness.com;  call: 800.300.5764  or  Email

Be sure to check out our Media Page:  https://restaurantexpertwitness.com/media-inquiries-restaurant-expert-witness-tv-radio-print-publications/

 

Restaurant Expert Witness Says, ‘Check Your Security Policy!’

Security Policies Save Lives

Restaurant Expert Witness Says, ‘Check Your Security Policy!’

 

Restaurant Expert Witness Says, 'Check Your Security Policy!'

 

Workplace violence in restaurants is a tragic and widespread problem. Just this weekend, a shooting in a Baltimore bar left 4 people dead. Below you’ll find an excerpt of Restaurant OSHA Safety and Security detailing steps you can take to keep your restaurant safe — and to save lives.


Restaurant OSHA Safety and Security

Chapter 51.  Security

Restaurants and bars are prime targets for robbery, burglary, theft, and other criminal and violent activity—due in large part to their odd hours of operation (early mornings and late nights), the number of diverse people from all demographics who frequent them, the serving of alcoholic beverages, and the large amounts of cash transactions that take place. Consider, for example, the following statistics:

    • There are more than one million restaurants in the United States
    • Over 14 million restaurant employees
    • 25 percent of all retail business establishments are restaurants
    • It is an annual $700+ billion industry
    • The average annual sales per restaurant is approximately $800,000
    • The average American eats out five times per week
    • One out of four Americans consume fast food each day
    • 33 percent of all EEOC sexual harassment claims come from the restaurant industry
    • 21 percent of all workplace robberies occur in restaurants and bars

51.1 Steps to Avoid Security Risks and Liabilities

Crimes committed in restaurants and bars often result in injuries, harm, and even death to employees and patrons. It is restaurant industry standard to have established written safety policies, practices, and procedures pertaining to restaurant security and to implement and train these policies, practices, and procedures on a continual and ongoing basis. Security matters include, but are not limited to: back door security, lighting security, security personnel (bouncers, doormen, etc.), crime prevention training (robbery prevention, response procedures, etc.), physical barriers, and surveillance and alarm systems (how to operate, disable, and engage, etc.).

51.2 Safe Work Practices

OSHA’s General Duty Clause requires employers to provide a safe and healthful workplace; employers who do not take reasonable steps to prevent or abate a recognized safety and security hazard can be cited. OSHA advises, and it is restaurant industry standard, to follow best practices and take preventative measures regarding safety and security; including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Secure the workplace.
  • Install video surveillance.
  • Install extra lighting.
  • Install alarm systems.
  • Conduct background checks on new hires—this is especially important pertaining to those who will have access to keys, codes, passwords, and cash and those who will be in charge of safety and security of the facility and other individuals.
  • Minimize access by outsiders through identification badges, electronic keys, and guards.
  • Provide drop safes to limit the amount of cash on hand.
  • Keep a minimal amount of cash in registers during evenings and late-night hours (typically, robbers like to strike late at night or in the early morning hours when there are fewer employees on duty).
  • Post signs saying, “No more than $100 in cash register at all times.”
  • Keep the cash register closed when not in use.
  • Keep the cash register in line of sight of other employees.
  • Do not count cash in front of customers.
  • When appropriate, equip staff with cellular phones and hand-held alarms or noise devices and require those who have to travel to prepare a daily work plan and keep a contact person informed of their location throughout the day.
  • Keep employer-provided vehicles properly maintained.
  • Instruct employees not to enter any location where they feel unsafe.
  • Establish and follow lock-up procedures.
  • Introduce and follow a “buddy system” when employees need to be outside after dark or when employees leave the restaurant at the same time.
  • Assess staffing needs at high-risk areas and times.
  • Install a panic button under the counter to quickly notify the police and be sure to inform and train each employee on its location and use.
  • Never allow an employee to be left to work alone in the restaurant.
  • Avoid traveling alone and entering into unfamiliar locations or situations whenever possible.
  • Provide an escort or police assistance in potentially dangerous situations or at night or for anyone who has a shift that ends late and must walk through a dark parking lot to their vehicle.
  • Alert management to any concerns about safety and security immediately—verbally and in writing.
  • Install height markers to help employees identify the height of suspects.
  • Establish and follow a reporting system for all incidents.
  • Develop, implement, and train a restaurant safety plan for dealing with unsatisfied customers, robbery, or theft.
  • Report incidents to local police promptly.
  • Use panic bars on exit doors so they can be locked, but employees can safely exit if they need to.
  • Provide for exit route doors from the inside of a building at all times without keys, tools, or special knowledge requirements.
  • OSHA Standard:  Means of Egress, 1910.36(d)(1): Employees must be able to open an exit route door from the inside at all times without keys, tools, or special knowledge. A device such as a panic bar that locks only from the outside is permitted on exit discharge doors.
  • Keep the back doors locked unless you are receiving a delivery.
  • Set up regular times for deliveries.

Warning:  Child labor laws forbid young workers (younger than sixteen) from working after 7 p.m. except from June 1st through Labor Day when evening hours are extended to 9 p.m. Do not leave young workers alone at night to lock up. (Note:  State child labor laws may be even more stringent.)

Sadly, many times the offender comes from within the restaurant itself. A large percentage of armed robberies and theft in restaurants involve current and former restaurant employees and friends. According to the US Chamber of Commerce, approximately 75 percent of employees steal from their workplace; and the National Restaurant Association estimates that employee theft—through either loss of inventory (shrinkage) or loss of cash and merchandise (larceny)—is responsible for 75 percent of inventory shortages found in restaurants (equaling about four percent of total sales). For every dollar stolen, a business needs approximately $20 in sales to recover; employee theft costs restaurants an estimated $3 billion to $6 billion per year.

Over time, employees get comfortable with their jobs and their surroundings, and they become familiar with how things work on a day-to-day basis. Also, over time, management can become lazy and stop following the customary policies and procedures regarding safety, health, and security. Too often, they mistakenly trust the wrong person. This combination of events provides ample opportunity to those employees who are dishonest to access the facility, food product, cash, and merchandise.

There are many ways in which restaurant employees steal—some may be more intentional than others; however, the effects on your bottom line remain the same. For instance, wait staff often think that giving away a free drink to a customer is no big deal, and bartenders who over-pour think they’re just providing great service to keep the customer coming back for more; but these acts add up to huge monetary losses at the end of the day.

A more deliberate act of thievery, and one that is more common than you may care to know, is when restaurant employees put food products (sometimes even whole roasts and hams) in the bottom of a clean garbage bag at the beginning of their shift; then they insert this bag into a trash can with another garbage bag inserted inside of that one. When it’s time to empty the trash can, the employees remove the double bags from the trash container and take them outside, pull the bag with the real garbage out, and place it in the dumpster, then take the bottom bag full of merchandise to their cars—or come back and “dumpster dive” for their stash after closing time.

51.3 Back Door Security and Control

When it comes to security, the back door area of a restaurant is one of the most vulnerable, not only because of who might come in through the back door, but what might be going out as well (such as the example provided above of the hidden food products in the garbage bags).

Normally, the outside rear of the restaurant is an area designated for the garbage dumpsters and trash cans, and these areas are sometimes poorly lit. Many times, employees leave the back doors unlocked or propped open to make taking out the trash easier, to let in fresh air if the kitchen gets overheated, or perhaps to take a quick smoke break whenever they feel the urge.

Unfortunately, these unsecured doors also allow would-be thieves to slip in and out unnoticed, carrying valuable merchandise with them, or allow access to those with even more serious crimes in mind like rape, robbery, or murder.

To prevent and limit exposure to such dangerous crimes, it is reasonable and customary in the restaurant industry to establish, implement, and train back door policies and procedures, such as, but not limited to, the following:

    • Ensure that the back door itself is as safe and secure as possible. There are several ways to accomplish this: for example, video surveillance, automatic closure, exterior jimmy plate, automatic locking system, peephole, inside panic bar, no exterior knob, and/or a door buzzer or alarm system.
    • Restaurant employees should not be allowed to use the back door to enter or leave the restaurant.
    • The back door should never be left open or propped open.
    • Management should make monitoring the back door part of their “management walk” (refer to section 26, Internal Safety Audits, Inspections, and Walkthroughs).
    • Management should never leave their keys in the doors or in the alarm system.
    • Management should never share secret codes or passwords to alarm systems with employees, and they should never allow employees to use their keys for any reason.
    • Never provide keys, codes, or passwords to vendors or suppliers and do not leave vendors and suppliers unattended while making their deliveries.
    • When necessary to open the back door (for trash removal or deliveries), a member of management should always be present.
    • A sign should be posted on both the inside (and outside) of the door, stating the rules for authorized openings.

Want to know more about how to keep your restaurant safe? Get a FREE SAMPLE download of the book at RestaurantOSHA.com or go to Howard’s page at Amazon.com to purchase your copy!
 

 

Restaurant Expert Witness Asks: What Would You Choose for Your Last Meal?

International Ask a Question Day

Restaurant Expert Witness Asks: What Would You Choose for Your Last Meal?

This past Friday was International Ask a Question Day so we decided to participate a little late in the game. Better late than never, right? Restaurant Expert Witness Asks: What Would You Choose for Your Last Meal? Is there a certain restaurant or person that you would want to prepare it? Inquiring minds want to know. Make sure you share and see what your friends have to say (even though we know you will have a much better answer).

 

Restaurant Expert Witness Asks: What Would You Choose for Your Last Meal?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to learn more about Restaurant Expert Witness, Howard Cannon, and the expert services he provides? Click here:  Howard Cannon, Restaurant Expert Witness – Bio;  Visit:  www.RestaurantExpertWitness.com;  call: 800.300.5764  or  Email

Be sure to check out our Media Page:  https://restaurantexpertwitness.com/media-inquiries-restaurant-expert-witness-tv-radio-print-publications/

 

The Truth, The Whole Truth, and Nothing But the Truth

We Can’t Make This Up Even if We Tried

The Truth, The Whole Truth, and Nothing But the Truth

As an expert witness, Howard Cannon is always under oath. He spends his life bound to telling the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. Recently, some investigators in Waco, Texas faced a $350 million lawsuit after lying under oath while in court for a restaurant case. The truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth really shouldn’t be that hard.

 

 

 

The Truth, The Whole Truth, and Nothing But the Truth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Want to learn more about Restaurant Expert Witness, Howard Cannon, and the expert services he provides? Click here:  Howard Cannon, Restaurant Expert Witness – Bio;  Visit:  www.RestaurantExpertWitness.com;  call: 800.300.5764  or  Email

Be sure to check out our Media Page:  https://restaurantexpertwitness.com/media-inquiries-restaurant-expert-witness-tv-radio-print-publications/